Stress

OutspokenC2 Welcomes Kimberly Bridi, C-IAYT, ERYT 500

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Kimberly receives her M.S. in Counseling Psychology in October of 2018. Her interest and expertise lie in the area of trauma resolution and chronic pain management in children and adults. She specializes in using evidence-based somatic and mind-body therapies with clients.

She is a trauma-based clinical yoga therapist who spent nearly 3 years developing yoga therapy programs in the U.S. Army’s first Interdisciplinary Pain Management program. During her time as a civilian provider, she helped manage and facilitate the Intensive Outpatient Program at Dwight D Eisenhower Army Medical Center to help reduce the use of opioids among service members. She worked with patients healing from chronic pain, trauma, drug and alcohol addiction and treatment resistant conditions.

Following her time with the Army, she created a non-profit organization to provide yoga-based therapies for military and veterans recovering from service-based conditions such as PTSD, traumatic brain injury, military sexual trauma and drug and alcohol use. She was awarded a local grant to implement a yoga-based treatment program for military sexual trauma in 2016.

Kim’s clinical training in trauma resolution includes the study of evidence-based techniques by leading experts including Dr. Bessel van Der Kolk and Dr. Peter Levine.

Previously she worked with children and teens healing from trauma and attachment issues, developed social skills groups for special needs children, and implemented her programs in schools.

She lives in Martinez GA with her two boys and two dogs. She loves hiking and backpacking, watersports and is a life-long student of yoga.

 

 

 

Stress and Time Management

Stress can come from many aspects of our daily life. One aspect is poor time management. We often become overwhelmed with our personal, professional and social responsibilities. It's important to learn time management skills to balance the many things we want to do and the things we need to do. Becoming structured andorganized will   decrease the levels of stress we experience.  Below you will find four steps to help you start managing your time. 

Learn how to say no.  In many cases, time management stress originates from over-commitment.  Perhaps you feel uncomfortable telling someone no due to fear of disappointment.   You may be concerned about losing friends or “falling off the radar” if you pass on the latest invitation.  That is a normal reaction, but rest assured that saying no to things you cannot fit into your schedule will not hurt your relationship with someone, particularly if that relationship is built on mutual respect and is a true friendship.   Don’t worry about finding a good excuse, as that can often lead to stretching the truth which you’ll later feel guilty about and can cause even more stress.   The best approach is to be direct and polite.

Prioritize.  Sit down and look at how you’re spending your days.  What’s truly important to you?  What is essential to your daily routine?  How can you cut out non-essential tasks and group tasks together so that you can manage them more effectively?

Make time to plan.  Set aside at least 10 minutes each day to review the next day’s activities and plan for the coming weeks ahead.  A schedule isn’t worth very much if it isn’t up to date, so strive to maintain your time management system once it is established!

Ask for help.  Are you making a special trip to the dry cleaners each week when your spouse drives right past it every day to work?  What may be an hour roundtrip activity for you could just be an extra 5 or 10 minutes for them.  Sit down with your partner and review the household duties periodically to make sure you have a system that’s effective for both of you.